Murphy's Law

Tom Murphy

Archive for October 2008

PR blog posts crash and Is my work here complete?…

I’m delighted to report that wading through my RSS reader this evening was a lot less stressful than usual. 

It appears that the combination of the US presidential election and the continuing global economic uncertainty have combined to reduce the volume of PR blog posts this week…

Or… maybe neither events have anything to do with it. Who knows? In fact who cares? Probably no one.

While the post volume is down overall, I have noticed that the self-promotion quota of the PR blogosphere is climbing steadily.

Now we all know that self praise is no praise. I’ll say no more on the subject. (I’m great by the way..)

Time to archive the blog?

Now gentle reader, after over six and a half years blogging inane drivel for my “micro-audience” – to use “marketing 2.0” segmentation terminology- I think my work on the blogosphere may be complete.

I have an incredible amount of respect for Steve Rubel.  He has done a fantastic job evangelizing how new media can, is and will impact Public Relations.  His hard work and dedication has had a real tangible effect on PR people’s knowledge of “Web 2.0.”.

But, Steve’s weakness – and I’m sure he would acknowledge it himself – is that sometimes he gets a little too close to the hyperbole machine. It’s not criminal but I sometimes think it dilutes the value of his message.

Well, Steve is interviewed on imediaconnection.com and I don’t know how to say this… but… I agree with his views in the article.

He’s preaching:

  • Evolution of PR and marketing not revolution
  • He’s talking about starting with understanding your audience
  • He’s even stated the press release isn’t dead (yet).

"I see press releases having an important role in a few areas," he says. "First of all, they communicate a message very quickly to the press, which is something that a blog or a feed really can’t do. And they reach a large number of people, particularly investors. Also, they can have a high impact on search engines, and I think that’s important to look at."

Ladies and gentlemen my work here is done.

I’m not sure there’s much point in continuing, it’ll all be an anticlimax from here 🙂

You will be relieved to know that there is one tiny little thing that I do feel compelled to comment on though.

What exactly does a “Director of Insights” do for a living?

Written by Tom Murphy

October 8, 2008 at 9:27 pm

Posted in General

PR blog posts crash and Is my work here complete?…

I’m delighted to report that wading through my RSS reader this evening was a lot less stressful than usual. 

It appears that the combination of the US presidential election and the continuing global economic uncertainty have combined to reduce the volume of PR blog posts this week…

Or… maybe neither events have anything to do with it. Who knows? In fact who cares? Probably no one.

While the post volume is down overall, I have noticed that the self-promotion quota of the PR blogosphere is climbing steadily.

Now we all know that self praise is no praise. I’ll say no more on the subject. (I’m great by the way..)

Time to archive the blog?

Now gentle reader, after over six and a half years blogging inane drivel for my “micro-audience” – to use “marketing 2.0” segmentation terminology- I think my work on the blogosphere may be complete.

I have an incredible amount of respect for Steve Rubel.  He has done a fantastic job evangelizing how new media can, is and will impact Public Relations.  His hard work and dedication has had a real tangible effect on PR people’s knowledge of “Web 2.0.”.

But, Steve’s weakness – and I’m sure he would acknowledge it himself – is that sometimes he gets a little too close to the hyperbole machine. It’s not criminal but I sometimes think it dilutes the value of his message.

Well, Steve is interviewed on imediaconnection.com and I don’t know how to say this… but… I agree with his views in the article.

He’s preaching:

  • Evolution of PR and marketing not revolution
  • He’s talking about starting with understanding your audience
  • He’s even stated the press release isn’t dead (yet).

"I see press releases having an important role in a few areas," he says. "First of all, they communicate a message very quickly to the press, which is something that a blog or a feed really can’t do. And they reach a large number of people, particularly investors. Also, they can have a high impact on search engines, and I think that’s important to look at."

Ladies and gentlemen my work here is done.

I’m not sure there’s much point in continuing, it’ll all be an anticlimax from here 🙂

You will be relieved to know that there is one tiny little thing that I do feel compelled to comment on though.

What exactly does a “Director of Insights” do for a living?

Written by Tom Murphy

October 8, 2008 at 8:03 pm

Posted in General

Treat technology as you would a friend…

I have to admit I enjoy it when the online discussion moves from the ethereal norm to something that reflects reality.

The issue of information overload and the use of technology, is something that impacts everyone today.

When we talk about “social media” and how “Web 2.0” will change PR, one of the key issues is how these things are impacting your audience (if at all).  People have limited time, and real lives. We can talk about the online revolution but if people don’t have the time or the energy then it’s a mute discussion.

I think it is very interesting – not to mention incredibly important – to understand how people are dealing with the volume and variety of information they’re dealing with every day.  (That’s why back in August I shared how I use Microsoft OneNote to manage my day – and would love to hear from others on how they are managing theirs… 🙂 )

Back at the beginning of September, Jeremy Pepper called on people to think long and hard about how they are using technology and to think about how more traditional tools may be even more productive for certain tasks. In fact, he called for people to discard “technology” and use the phone! You can see from the number of comments on the post that this is a subject that is exercising a lot of peoples’ imaginations.

While technology has its place in public relations, we have been over-relying on the tools for so long that the basics of public relations – the relationships and the connectivity with face-to-face meetings and the ability to do good phone – have been lost. It’s the few that can do it, and do it well.

Shel Holtz has responded to Jeremy’s post with a call for balance. In essence, use the right tool for the right job.  Sometimes the phone may be more effective, sometimes e-mail is best. Your job, and your challenge, is to choose the right tool for the right job.

But if each tool is used based on its strengths, then it becomes a matter of thoughtful integration of all the tools, not an artificial abandonment of a tool that has become a vital part of a PR practitioner’s communication mix.

I’m a passionate believer in balance. 

Having an insight into your audience – big or small – and therefore an understanding into what’s the most effective way of reaching and communicating with them  – is your challenge.

Written by Tom Murphy

October 3, 2008 at 9:37 pm

Posted in General

Creative uses of Social Media

Creativity is often the elixir for our online activities.  How often are you on the quest to make something “viral”?

Well of course it’s not just PR practitioners and marketers who seek online creativity.

Criminals are often very successful in the creative use of social media – and I’m not talking about phishers or spammers here.

How about this story about a robber in Monroe, Washington who used Craigslist to recruit loads of people to unwittingly act as decoys as he robbed a security truck…

But apparently, the robber had planned ahead. In case anyone was hot on his trail, he had at least a dozen unsuspecting decoys waiting nearby, which he recruited on Craigslist.

An armored car sits outside a Bank of America branch in Monroe, Wash. on Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2008. Police say a man tried to rob the car, then jumped into a creek that led to the Skykomish River.

"I came across the ad that was for a prevailing wage job for $28.50 an hour," said Mike, who saw a Craigslist ad last week looking for workers for a road maintenance project in Monroe.

He said he inquired and was e-mailed back with instructions to meet near the Bank of America in Monroe at 11 a.m. Tuesday. He also was told to wear certain work clothing.

"Yellow vest, safety goggles, a respirator mask… and, if possible, a blue shirt," he said.

Some online marketing agency should snap him up….

Via Boing Boing

Written by Tom Murphy

October 2, 2008 at 11:10 am

Posted in General