Murphy's Law

Tom Murphy

Archive for October 2012

Reality Check: All views are my own

It’s interesting to see how many people add phrasing like: “all views expressed here are my own and don’t reflect the views of my employer” on their Twitter biography.

It’s especially interesting to see PR people including it.

Why is it interesting you may (rightly) ask?

imageWell because nothing is further from the truth.

If you’re a Public Relations practitioner (and you could argue any employee) and you’re tweeting, then it’s all on the record.

I’m not debating if this is right or wrong, I’m just pointing out the reality.

Next up: Why adding “RT isn’t an endorsement” to your bio makes no sense, because a RT is an implicit endorsement (unless you happen to add some sarcastic commentary – and in that case refer to the first point).

Written by Tom Murphy

October 19, 2012 at 9:45 am

Posted in General

About

Disclaimer: This is Tom Murphy’s personal weblog.  In an ideal world the opinions I express on this blog and the associated web pages would represent my own personal views and not those of my current, prior or future employers. Of course we know the world is never that simple and I’ll write on this blog with that in mind :).

  • Murphy’s Law is my blog about Public Relations and technology.
  • PR Opinions, is an archive of all my PR posts from March 2002 to August 2006.

Tom Murphy

I live and work in Washington state in the United States where I work as director of corporate communications for citizenship at Microsoft Corporation. I moved to the United States in March 2009. Prior to that I spent four years running Microsoft’s local Citizenship and Public Relations programs in Ireland.

I started working in public relations in 1992 and I’ve had the great fortune to work in a range of great in-house and agency roles working with many of the world’s greatest technology brands such as Corel, Gateway, Intel and Microsoft, as well as a range of successful independent start-ups.  I’ve also had fantastic opportunities to work around Europe, Middle East and Africa, Asia and North America.

I started blogging about public relations and other things in 2002.  I am a passionate advocate of the importance of great communications and the positive impact of social media.  However, I am a pragmatist and I eschew the hyperbole you often find about social media.  I believe that great PR starts with your business objectives and your strategy.  Social media is no different.  Understand your business and your audience – avoid the hype!

If I blog about a Microsoft product or service it will be tagged with He would say that  – that’s my formal disclosure tag.

I’m married to the long-suffering Sorcha and we have the world’s best son, Cillian and the world’s best daughter, Anna.

If you want to get in contact:

E-mail: tpemurphy -AT- hotmail.com

Mobile: +1-425-614-614-6

MSN IM: tpemurphy -AT- hotmail.com

Twitter: @tpemurphy

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/tpemurphy

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/tpemurphy

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Comment policy: Comments on any of these blogs are moderated. Any comments I deem inappropriate for this blog will be not be posted.  Where those comments are not spam, I will flag that decision with the person who submitted the post. Comments on the PR Opinions blog are closed.

Written by Tom Murphy

October 5, 2012 at 9:09 am

Posted in General

PR needs Jacks and Jills of all trades

One of the wonders of the English language is that it’s always evolving. For example, according to Wikipedia (disclaimer: it is Wikipedia so the following information may have no basis in fact and could actually have been made up by a seventeen year old sitting in his bedroom, but because it serves my purpose I’m going with it) the figure of speech “Jack of all trades, master of none” actually started out as “Jack (or Jill) of all trades” and was meant in a positive way about someone who was a master of integration.

I believe being a ‘Jill of all trades’ in PR is something to be embraced and encouraged.

One of the challenges and great characteristics of Public Relations is change. While many of the core tenets of good Public Relations practice remain, the actual day-to-day work of a PR professional today is a sea change from when I started working in PR just over twenty years ago. We’ve new tools, new challenges, new demands, new opportunities.

A PR professional today must have the ability to build compelling, long term strategies, understand their (and client’s or employer’s) business and the broader business environment, be conversant in new tools and approaches, be pragmatic about choosing the right tools for the right job, and be creative.

Having a broad set of experiences is a benefit not a disadvantage. Great PR people can integrate and use traditional and social tools, they are comfortable analyzing data, good writers, great connectors, have the ability to scenario plan, to think quickly and clearly. The list goes on and on. But ultimately you need a broad set of knowledge, skills and experiences to succeed in the profession today.

There are of course people who operate as ‘specialists’, but the vast majority of successful practitioners have developed a broad set of skills and continue to drive themselves to broaden their knowledge whether its new tools, new ways of engaging audiences, new ways to measure impact or the lack thereof.

For today’s PR professional, being a Jill or Jack of all trades, and master of none is often both an advantage and a compliment.

Written by Tom Murphy

October 5, 2012 at 6:32 am

Posted in General

Does your CEO have to be active in Social Media?

No.

Written by Tom Murphy

October 4, 2012 at 9:12 am

Posted in General