Murphy's Law

Tom Murphy

Remember why you blog…

With all the content being generated around blogging – from debates on how blogs are going to replace the media to why blogs are a fad, and everything in between – I fear that people are losing sight of why the blog could be an important addition to corporate communications – namely it provides a better means to building relationships and providing better customer service.

There was a fantastic example of this with the re-launch of the new look UK Guardian newspaper last week.

As you may know, the Guardian has been at the forefront of offering their readers new innovative online services and they were early adopters of editorial blogs – but in the past week they’ve showcased how to incorporate blogging into your core business.

The re-designed Guardian (which includes a new size) has been well recieved and the editors have used their blogs to give an interesting insight into the preparation for the launch of the new format.

However, there was a small problem. Due to the paper’s new size a couple of the traditional items at the back of the paper were dropped or replaced. One such omission was the Doonesbury cartoon. The editors through talking with readers and research had found little objection to removing it. Unfortunately a large number of readers felt differently. And there was a lot of discussions on the Guardian blogs last week with readers calling for its return. And following all this blog-led pressure, the editors have listened to their audience and Doonesbury has returned.

Now I realize this is very small beer in the bigger scheme of things, but it’s a useful reminder that having a corporate blog is all good and well, but if it’s not integrated with the rest of the organization and if you’re not willing to engage in dialogue and act on feedback from your customers then it’s of limited value. The Guardian’s editors have listened and have acted – that’s good blog relations.

Footnote:
Thanks to Fergus Cassidy for the story.

Written by Tom Murphy

September 20, 2005 at 8:02 am

Posted in General

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