Slow down you blog too fast.. and other blog PR stuff

  • I have to say these two posts hit the bullseye for me.  Mason Cole and John Wagner tackle the issue of the hair trigger bloggers [Stuart has a similar post here.].  The knee jerk reactions that spread like widlfire across the blogosphere, with some notable exceptions, do nothing to build the credibility of the medium.  Instead it betrays an immaturity that says to me it’s not quite ready for the real-time. We need more balance.

 

  • One the other hand, the fantastic thing (potentially) about the blogosphere is the volume and diversity of opinion.  It’s incredibly interesting – though sometime very hard – to keep track of every blog.  However, sometimes its worth a good browse.  if you’re interested in getting your RSS reader wet, click over to Todd Andrlik who has pulled together a list of the “The Power 150 – America’s Top Marketing Blogs”.  Loads of food for thought among those links.

 

  • Steve Rubel has a post on how ZDnet is remunerating its bloggers based on the number of clicks their posts get. According to long-time trade journo, Mary Jo Foley:

 

 “It rewards people… who do a lot of work to make sure that their blogs are popular, which is what I do.”

 

  • Of all the new world technology, services etc., it strikes me that after blogs, the next most accessible audience channel is podacsting.  It has amazing potential as a communications and marketing channel, and as with all media if your content is right, you’ll build an audience.  One of the things possibly holding back corporate podcasts is the potential technical requirements. Scott Baradell’s client Blogtalk radio is offering a way to sidestep the technical issue. He’s even published five hacks for the PR pro. Worth a visit.

 

 

  • Finally, Richard Edelman comments on the recent laptop furore – I’ll say no more  – and Colin McKay has some feedback for him :-)

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