Traditional media, ghosts, online friends and no comment…

Well a month has passed since I arrived in the United States. Here is a meek attempt at a catch up.  You may find some interesting stuff here.

America’s traditional media challenges continue

In case you missed it, the Pew Research Center has published the 2009 edition of their “State of the News Media” an analysis on American journalism.  The findings present a challenging environment for traditional media.

Perhaps least noticed yet most important, the audience migration to the Internet is now accelerating. The number of Americans who regularly go online for news, by one survey, jumped 19% in the last two years; in 2008 alone traffic to the top 50 news sites rose 27%. Yet it is now all but settled that advertising revenue—the model that financed journalism for the last century—will be inadequate to do so in this one. Growing by a third annually just two years ago, online ad revenue to news websites now appears to be flattening; in newspapers it is declining.

The report is a comprehensive look at newspapers, magazines, television, radio etc.  I plan to review this in some depth…

<Supplemental – TechCrunch reports that the US Newspaper industry lost $7.5 Billion in advertising revenues in 2008 – still $37 billion though!>


The problem with ghost writing

This brought a smile to my face.  Marketing 101 if you’re going to ghost write something whether it’s an op-ed, a blog, or a tweet, let the “author” know about it.  Doh. <Hat tip to Jim Horton>


Grooming your spokespeople – how many online friends do they have?

Andrew Smith reports a journalist using LinkedIn to check the credibility of a spokesperson.  Nothing too surprising there, however how many of us are actively managing our spokespeople’s SEO?  Very few I imagine.


The art (or not) of attribution

This is a great article by Clark Hoyt in the New York Times.

It would be wrong, however, to lay all of the blame with the sources. News organizations are sometimes too eager to pounce on misstatements and missteps, leaving those they cover understandably wary. Credibility runs both ways.

PR & SEO, pitching tips, social media, and Twitter

When I talk to PR people about social media, the one thing that rarely comes up is Search Engine Optimization.  Now I agree that search engines are very Web 1.0, but they’re still the number one pathway around the Internet.  If you’re managing online reputation you better understand search engines.  Lee Odden offers some thoughts on the subject.


Following Jason Calacanis’ post that you don’t need a PR firm (sigh)… Dave Fleet offers an interesting retort and points out what you should all know. Public Relations is about a hell of a lot more than media relations!


US journalist Rafe Needleman is now offering tips/guidelines/pet hates for PR people to consider prior to a pitch.


Newsgator is hosting a free recorded webinar with Shel Holtz on the topic of how you ensure your audiences are getting the right message.  It’s being published on August 28th and it will cover how social media is changing corporate communications and real world examples of companies using social media. You can sign up here.


Twitter certainly hasn’t hit the "trough of disillusionment" (yet).  Chris Brogan offers 50 ideas for using Twitter for business. [Hat tip: Neville]